By Kara McMahon, Christopher (ILT) Moroney Christopher Moroney

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Extra info for Animal Alphabet - From Ape to Zebra

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In the infrared, we also see small windows where the atmosphere allows significant transmission. 7: Two distant point objects at an angular separation θ viewed by a telescope. 8. 7. We can resolve these two objects only if their image is clearly separated. A telescope has two basic components: an objective and an eye piece. The objective receives light from the astronomical object and forms its image. This is the most important component of a telescope. It may consist of a convex lens or a concave mirror.

N=1 θ n = nk θ n = nk−1 . 18: A plane parallel model of the atmosphere. We split the atmosphere into several layers with refractive indices n0 , n1 ... nk . Beyond the kth layer we assume that the refractive index is unity, corresponding to vacuum. A ray of light strikes the top of the atmosphere at an angle θ relative to the normal to the surface. After undergoing refraction through the atmosphere, it strikes the surface of Earth at an angle ξ. (Adapted from H. 1 Theoretical Limit on Resolution A fundamental limit on the resolution of any instrument, which may be the human eye or a telescope, arises due to diffraction.

1 Equatorial Mount . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Azimuthal Mount . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Interferometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Observations at Other Wavelengths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 20 23 24 27 29 31 32 33 33 33 33 34 We observe the Universe at many different wavelengths, visible light being most common.

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